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Sex: Women's Sexual Behaviors May Be Closer To Men's Than Previously Thought

COLUMBUS, Ohio - A new study suggests that men and women might not be as far apart in sexual behaviors as previous research has shown. In many surveys, men typically report engaging in sex at earlier age, more often, and with more sexual partners than do women. However, a new study shows that some reported gender differences might show up because women don't always answer surveys honestly, but give answers they believe are expected of them. "Women are sensitive to social expectations for their sexual behavior and may be less than totally honest when asked about their behavior in some survey conditions," said Terri Fisher, co-author of the study and associate professor of psychology at Ohio State University's Mansfield campus. ... For more see link below

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Feminine Face Is Key To A Woman’s Heart

SCIENTISTS believe they have created the perfect male face, a man so handsome that any woman would automatically pick him out of a crowd. He has large expressive eyes set in a smooth-skinned symmetrical face, a straight nose and rounded hair and jaw line. Although his makers admit he looks slightly girly, they have found modern women want caring feminine traits rather than more macho markings. They say bearded men and others with features that suggest they are unlikely to wash up or change a nappy can forget about impressing women... For more visit link below

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The Brain In Love

For generations scientists have studied the peacock feathers of human mating, the swish and swagger that advertise sexual interest, the courtship dance at bars, the public display. They've left the private experience -- what's happening in the brain when we fall for someone -- mostly to poets. We know there's an inborn human urge to mate, after all. Love is a mystery, a promise, an arrow from Cupid's bow. ...For more see link below

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Sexual attraction: the magic formula

Selecting a mate is the most crucial decision of our lives. We spend a huge amount of time and energy trying to find that special someone. Our appetite for a relationship fuels a billion-pound industry of matchmaking services. Yet we¡¯re often not satisfied. A 2005 survey of more than 900 people who had been using online dating services revealed that three-quarters had not found what they were looking for. We seem as much in the dark as ever about who is a suitable match. As a scientist studying human behaviour, I am not too surprised by the mysterious nature of how we go about choosing a partner. Mate selection is a highly complex process. We are consciously aware of only part of it; the rest is either inherently unpredictable or operates outside our awareness, which leads us to the perception that love is about ineffable chemistry. Let¡¯s start with the conscious part. There are some things we all find attractive. Men tend to desire women with features that suggest youth and fertility, including a low waist-to-hip ratio, full lips and soft facial features. Recent studies confirm that women have strong preferences for virile male beauty ¡ª taut bodies, broad shoulders, clear skin and defined, masculine facial features, all of which may indicate sexual potency and good genes. We also know that women are attracted to men who look as if they have wealth or the ability to acquire it, and that men and women strongly value intelligence in a mate. Preferences for these qualities ¡ª beauty, brains and resources ¡ª are universal. The George Clooneys and Angelina Jolies of the world are sex symbols for predictable biological reasons. Of course, we don¡¯t fall in love with super-mates like these. The average person who did would be headed nowhere, because super-mates are inaccessible to all but a few. This is likely to be part of the reason why love evolved: to bond us for co-operative child-rearing, but also to assist us in choosing, so that we don¡¯t waste time and energy falling for someone who is unattainable. Instead, people tend to fall for others who, on attractiveness, intelligence and status, are of a similar ranking to themselves. So much for outward appearances. What about the less obvious cues of attraction? Fascinating work on genetics and mate preferences has shown that each of us will be attracted to people who possess a particular set of genes, known as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), which plays a critical role in the ability to fight pathogens. Mates with dissimilar MHC genes produce healthier offspring with broad immune systems. And the evidence shows that we are inclined to choose people who suit us in this way: couples tend to be less similar in their MHC than if they had been paired randomly. How do people who differ in their MHC find each other? This isn¡¯t fully understood, but we know that smell is an important cue. People appear to literally sniff out their mates. In studies, people tend to rate the scent of T-shirts worn by others with dissimilar MHC as most attractive. This is what sexual ¡°chemistry¡± is all about. The message here is: trust your instincts ¡ª except that there is an alarming exception. For women taking hormone contraceptives, the reverse is true: they prefer men whose MHC genes are similar to their own. Thus, women on the pill risk choosing a mate who is not genetically suitable (best to smell him first and go on the pill afterwards). This is a prime example of how chemical attraction can depend on your circumstances. Here¡¯s another example: attraction can fluctuate over the menstrual cycle. Men evaluate women¡¯s scents as more attractive when they are near ovulation, and in our studies at UCLA, we have found that men are more loving towards their partners as ovulation approaches. Women¡¯s preferences for certain male scents and other male features change over their cycle. Near ovulation, they prefer masculine traits; at other phases of their cycle they prefer less sexiness and more stability. All this suggests that the path to love can be somewhat random, particularly for women. Having sex can also complicate the way you perceive a potential partner. After sex, the brain releases oxytocin, which results in the warm, companionable feeling of love and the creation of the social bonds that facilitate co-operative child-rearing. Watch out: sex on a whim can lead to feelings of love for a person who is entirely wrong for you. Sex, of course, is not love. For scientists, love is a conundrum: strictly speaking, sexual desire takes care of reproduction, so what could be the purpose of love, especially since it makes us believe we have found our one true soul mate in a world filled with billions of alternatives? How would our ancestors have been served by such behaviour? One possibility is that feelings of love act as a ¡°stop rule¡± that terminates the search for a mate, even if only temporarily, so we commit to one person and get on with the business of mating. But that still poses the question, if the roads to love are so varied and random, how do we decide on a particular mate? It turns out that the problem of choice under uncertainty can be described and solved mathematically. Evolutionary psychologists Peter Todd at Indiana University and Geoffrey Miller at the University of New Mexico used a computer simulation to determine how a person might best choose from a number of potential partners. They set it up so that the person first assesses a number of the options available to them to decide what is the best they can aspire to in terms of attractiveness. They then go for the next person they come across who meets their aspirations, out of those they haven¡¯t already encountered. The researchers found that the optimum proportion of possible mates to ¡°examine¡± before setting your aspirations and making your choice is a mere 9% ¡ª so at a party with 100 possible mates, it¡¯s best to study only the first nine you randomly encounter before you choose. Examining fewer means you won¡¯t have enough information to make a good choice, examining more makes it likely you¡¯ll pass the best mate by. No doubt the models underestimate the complexity of real mate choice, but the fundamental insight is clear: don¡¯t search indefinitely before choosing, lest you miss out on all the good mates or run out of time altogether. Who we fall for is determined by a mix of factors, some of which we are aware of, some of which we experience indirectly. Happenstance can play a significant role, especially if we meet someone just after calibrating our aspirations, or at a particular stage of the hormonal cycle. There may be that special someone out there ¡ª but they¡¯re not necessarily the only one. Guy Taylor is a 32-year-old graphic designer who lives in south London ¡°I met this girl, let¡¯s call her Becca, in a random bar in Clapham one Wednesday evening. I was with a group of mates and we just got talking. I was a bit tipsy, but I definitely fancied her ¡ª she was just my type ¡ª so I suggested we hook up. When she left, I gave her a gentle peck on the cheek. The following Sunday, we met up for lunch at Inn the Park in St James¡¯s Park. I was excited, as I felt the date had potential. The banter was good, and everything was cool, but at the back of my mind, I was thinking, ¡°hang on a minute¡±. Something wasn¡¯t quite right ¡ª we were less flirty with each other than when we first met. Nevertheless, Becca and I spent the next few hours wandering around town chasing after the wooden Sultan¡¯s Elephant. It was a laugh, and we were happy to spend time in each other¡¯s company. We both had stuff to do, but neither of us wanted the date to end, so there must have been some sort of connection. We went to the cinema to see V for Vendetta. Everything was going well, with hand-holding and snuggling-up together. When we left, we had a kiss. That was the killer. It wasn¡¯t a passionate full-on snog, more going through the motions. There was something missing ¡ª that special feeling I should have felt just wasn¡¯t there. We fancied each other, but the spark was missing ¡ª I guess the chemistry was wrong. You can¡¯t fake that. Being a gentleman, I thought it would be a little harsh to just blow her out ¡ª I mean, in theory it should have worked ¡ª so I left a voicemail asking her to see me the following Wednesday. She sent me a text back, saying: ¡®For me, there was no spark.¡¯ I thought: ¡®You see? It wasn¡¯t just me.¡¯ ¡± WHEN THE CHEMISTRY IS WRONG Guy Taylor is a 32-year-old graphic designer who lives in south London ¡°I met this girl, let¡¯s call her Becca, in a random bar in Clapham one Wednesday evening. I was with a group of mates and we just got talking. I was a bit tipsy, but I definitely fancied her ¡ª she was just my type ¡ª so I suggested we hook up. When she left, I gave her a gentle peck on the cheek. The following Sunday, we met up for lunch at Inn the Park in St James¡¯s Park. I was excited, as I felt the date had potential. The banter was good, and everything was cool, but at the back of my mind, I was thinking, ¡°hang on a minute¡±. Something wasn¡¯t quite right ¡ª we were less flirty with each other than when we first met. Nevertheless, Becca and I spent the next few hours wandering around town chasing after the wooden Sultan¡¯s Elephant. It was a laugh, and we were happy to spend time in each other¡¯s company. We both had stuff to do, but neither of us wanted the date to end, so there must have been some sort of connection. We went to the cinema to see V for Vendetta. Everything was going well, with hand-holding and snuggling-up together. When we left, we had a kiss. That was the killer. It wasn¡¯t a passionate full-on snog, more going through the motions. There was something missing ¡ª that special feeling I should have felt just wasn¡¯t there. We fancied each other, but the spark was missing ¡ª I guess the chemistry was wrong. You can¡¯t fake that. Being a gentleman, I thought it would be a little harsh to just blow her out ¡ª I mean, in theory it should have worked ¡ª so I left a voicemail asking her to see me the following Wednesday. She sent me a text back, saying: ¡®For me, there was no spark.¡¯ I thought: ¡®You see? It wasn¡¯t just me.¡¯ ¡±

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Why women have better sex with rich men Women’s sexual pleasure is directly linked to their partner’s wealth, says new research Jonathan Leake and Holly Watt

Cassie is unrepentant about dating rich men. “Of course it is much better to sleep with men with lots of money,� said the 27-year-old lawyer from London. “Any girl who tells you different is lying. Rich men are powerful and successful and confident and charismatic. They know what they want, and they go out and get it. That translates to being fantastic in bed.� Cassie is living proof of the latest scientific discovery about human sexuality: that the number and frequency of a woman’s orgasms is directly related to her partner’s wealth. Her explanation is simple. “Women don’t want to lie back and think of the gas bill,� she said. “It’s a lot more fun to have sex in the Ritz than the Swindon Travelodge. And to be ripping off Rigby & Peller underwear than M&S knickers.� Cassie’s story of being attracted to rich and powerful men is, of course, as old as the hills. It was famously expressed in the question put by the spoof chat-show host Mrs Merton to one of her guests: “So, Debbie McGee, what first attracted you to the millionaire Paul Daniels?�. Examples abound. Even in his eighties, Hugh Hefner, the founder of Playboy, has a succession of young girlfriends. Ronnie Wood has recently shown that it’s not only Mick Jagger among the sixtysome-thing Rolling Stones who can attract much younger women, and Donald Trump, the portly American businessman, has a wife 24 years his junior. Until now some of us may have taken consolation in the idea that the beautiful women involved in such relationships were just doing it for the lifestyle - and enduring the sex. Now, however, science is showing that a rich man’s money has aphrodisiac qualities as well as purchasing power. Their partners really can have it all. Many will object to the idea that women are hardwired to be gold-diggers. Perhaps, however, they will be appeased by the revelation that the same kinds of primitive forces are at work in men too. They may operate in different ways and produce different behaviour - but they come from exactly the same source: a genetic code fine-tuned by millions of years of evolution to make us seek out whoever offers us the best deal in life. It was Charles Darwin who first offered a new explanation for the mysteries of mating. He suggested that characteristics evolved and spread through populations depending on how much they improved our ability to reproduce. Back then, the most obvious examples came from the animal world. When two stags locked horns they showed how members of the same sex compete with each other. Conversely, when female peahens chose the peacock with the flashiest tail they showed the power of mate preference. In both types of “sexual selection� as Darwin dubbed it, the lesser males were doomed to become evolutionary dead ends while their successful rivals passed their genes to posterity. Ever since then, researchers have been realising that such sexual strategies permeate the lives of all animals - including humans - and affect everything about our behaviour and relationships. Among all the discoveries, however, a mystery has remained: what is the point of the female orgasm? Among animal species few if any females experience anything like the intense pleasure felt by women. The only thing like it is seen in some primates such as macaques. Why, then, have humans evolved this source of pleasure? Dr Thomas Pollet and Professor Daniel Nettle, academics at the University of Newcastle, have been mulling over this question for years. As evolutionary psychologists, they believe everything about the way we flirt, court, have sex and bring up our children is strongly influenced by our genetic history. If female humans have acquired the ability to have powerful orgasms, they argue, then women will have evolved that ability for a reason. “Women’s capacity for orgasm could be an evolutionary adaptation that serves to discriminate between males on the basis of their quality,� said Pollet. “If so, then it should be more frequent in females paired with high-quality males.� He and Nettle tested that idea using data gathered in one of the world’s biggest lifestyle studies. The Chinese Health and Family Life Survey targeted 5,000 people across China to conduct in-depth interviews about their personal lives, including detailed questions about their sex lives, income and other factors. Among these were 1,534 women with male partners whose data formed the basis for the study. They found that 121 of these women always had orgasms during sex, while 408 had them “often�. Another 762 “sometimes� orgasmed, while 243 had them rarely or never. There were, of course, several factors at work in causing such differences but, said Pollet, money was one of the main ones. He said: “We found that increasing partner income had a highly positive effect on women’s self-reported frequency of orgasm. More desirable mates cause women to experience more orgasms.� This is not an effect limited to Chinese women. Previous research in Germany and America has found similar responses. However, it begs a further question: what does an orgasm actually achieve? Why does having more of them give a woman’s genes a better chance of passing down the generations? David Buss, professor of psychology at the University of Texas, Austin, who raised this question in his book The Evolution of Desire, believes female orgasms achieve several possible purposes. “They could promote emotional bonding with a high-quality male or they could serve as a signal that they are highly sexually satisfied, and hence unlikely to seek sex with other men,� he said. “In other words, they are saying ‘I’m extremely loyal, so you should invest in me and my children�.� The idea that our most intimate relationships are dominated by subconscious forces beyond our control may sound disturbing but it is widely confirmed by other research. Anthony Little, a psychologist at the University of Stirling who specialises in studying human attraction, has found that the type of men to whom women are attracted changes throughout the menstrual cycle. He said: “Most of the time, when women are not fertile, they prefer men who are more feminine but when they reach peak fertility they change and display a preference for more masculine traits, what you might call the rugby player look.� Underlying this is another idea some women might not welcome: that women are generally attracted to gentler looking men because they are more likely to show commitment to a relationship and to invest resources in children. However, for the week or so in each month when women are at their most fertile they are programmed to seek out the men with the “best� genes - the ones most likely to ensure their children survive. That means the man with the biggest muscles, the squarest jaw or, nowadays, the biggest bulge in his wallet. Such men are hard to keep so, once impregnated, women may return to their gentler long-term partner and trick him into bringing up a child that is not his. Other research shows that in most societies about 5%-10% of children have been fathered by men who were not the woman’s long-term partner at the time of conception. Given the scale of such threats, men have developed defences of their own - including the ability to subconsciously detect when women are at the peak of fertility. A study of lapdancers in America showed that men gave the best tips to those who were fertile, and the worst to those who were menstruating. The researchers suggested men can pick up a series of subtle cues such as the body scent, changes in complexion and body shape, and behaviour of fertile women. Ian Penton-Voak, a psychologist at Bristol University, believes such findings show nature at work in its rawest form. He said: “In some ways it makes us seem almost evil but it’s wrong to impose moral judgments. There are no morals involved in evolution and what we are producing is just knowledge about how it works.� Natasha, a 40-year-old professional woman from Surrey, believes she has benefited from giving way to her evolutionary urges. Recently she broke up with her husband of 12 years and found a rich boyfriend. “I do have much better sex than with my husband,� she said. “My boyfriend is rich, confident and attractive and makes me feel protected and safe. Women need to connect mentally for really great sex, it’s not just a physical thing. It needs to be someone you respect, and rich men get that sort of respect.� Here, however, a note of caution may be needed. Pollet and Nettle may have found women have more orgasms with rich men - but they also found no evidence that they were any happier overall. Meredith Small, professor of anthropology at Cornell University in New York state, suggests this discrepancy also shows the cunning of evolution. She said: “Even if a rich man is a jerk in every other way, having orgasms with him allows you to convince yourself that he is making you happy.� Cassie admits that relationships with rich men can be difficult. “The richest man I dated wasn’t great at calling and being places on time. But it was worth it anyway.� She added: “Poor men just aren’t the same, although with the recession there are a few more of them out there now. I wonder if it will make a difference to their performance?� The trouble with orgasms Little boy: “Mummy, mummy, mummy, what’s an orgasm?� Mother: “I don’t know, dear, go and ask your father.� Yep, after millions of years of evolution and almost as many sex surveys, much about the female orgasm remains a mystery. The male version is pretty easy to understand; but the whys and wherefores of female orgasms, or lack of them, are not so clear. Men are the root of the problem, of course. According to Jonathan Margolis, author of O: The Intimate History of the Orgasm, things began to go wrong when men lost their simple caveman instincts. Neanderthal man and woman apparently used to have no problem with sex, thinking it nothing more than a bit of fun. Then along came Neolithic man, an altogether more sophisticated kind of guy. After he made the connection between sex and childbirth, complications ensued. Customs arose that restricted sex and compounded male domination. Among the ultimate fallout were such oddities as the Victorians referring to a female orgasm as a “hysterical paroxysm�, and the supposed discovery in the 1980s of a highly sensitive female zone known as the G-spot. Last year an Italian university claimed that the elusive G-spot does exist - but that not all women had one. Very useful. Through all these trials, however, the power of sex has remained undiminished. According to the World Health Authority, 100m acts of sexual intercourse take place every day.

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Orgasm 'akin to a shot of heroin'

AMSTERDAM � According to Groningen professor Gert Holstege, an orgasm is akin to a shot of heroin and his findings could assist in the production of a so-called orgasm pill. Holstege said the interim results of his study � which showed that an orgasm and heroin have a similar effect on the brain and could be thus similar experiences � could have positive consequences for those who have difficulty having sex, such as the elderly, newspaper De Telegraaf reported on Wednesday. The Rijksuniversiteit Groningen professor said researchers used a so-called PET scan to conduct the investigation and sought willing volunteers to have sex inside the scan. The person who experienced an orgasm was requested to hold his or her head still while experiencing the physical sensation. The volunteers had practised before engaging in the research. Male participants were also requested to ejaculate within seven minutes � something that most participants did not have any problems with, Holstege said. The implications of the study means that a pill could in future be developed to assist people to not only have sex, but to also experience an orgasm. Erection pills such as Viagra, only assist people to have sex. But the researcher denied the new pill would be a simple "fun pill", claiming that the medicine could totally influence a person's emotions, allowing them not only to have sex, but to bring it to a satisfying end as well. "And that does not always succeed anymore with many men and women," Holstege said. The professor also said that most people want to continue having sex right up until they die and do not relish the prospect of being unable to give each other an orgasm. No time frame for the development of an orgasm pill was given, but Holstege said it would not occur in the short-term.

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Kisses

(LifeWire) -- Bad kissers -- we've all locked lips with one: the lizard, the washing machine, the cannibal, the spelunker. more photos » "I knew this girl that I'll call Big Tongue," recalls Craig Hinkle, 38, a Westminster, California-based network administrator. "Her tongue was massive, and she insisted on trying to put the entire thing in my mouth. She was very forceful with it, and I started choking." You can guess that relationship didn't last. And now, what Hinkle knows from experience is actually backed up by science: Bad kissers have little chance of getting to second base. In a study published recently in the scientific journal "Evolutionary Psychology," 59 percent of men and 66 percent of women said they've been in the position of being attracted to someone -- until they kissed the person. "At the moment of the kiss, there's a very complicated exchange of information ... that may tap into underlying evolved mechanisms" cluing us in on whether we're genetically compatible, explains Gordon Gallup, co-author of the study and professor of psychology at the State University of New York at Albany. "A kiss can be a deal-breaker in terms of whether a relationship will flower or flounder, so to speak." Rachel Myeroff, 26, can attest to that. On a second date with a guy, says the New York City-based sales manager, "he just went in for it and attached himself to me in the sloppiest, most horrible kiss ever. He was just consuming my mouth. I most definitely did not call him again." Why we kiss Gallup's research suggests that men and women have different agendas when it comes to kissing, an act that occurs in 95 percent of human societies and is believed to have been first recorded in Vedic Sanskrit texts around 1500 B.C. in India. For men, kissing is more often used as a means to an end -- namely, to gain sexual access. Men also are more likely to literally kiss and make up, using kissing to attempt reconciliation. Women on the other hand use kissing as a mate-assessment technique, Gallup notes. They subconsciously evaluate mating potential from the chemicals in their partner's saliva and breath, for instance. Women also use kissing as a bonding gesture, as well as to monitor the status of the relationship. If her partner's kissing frequency or technique suddenly changes, that perhaps is a sign of his waning interest. Other gender differences uncovered by Gallup's research: • Men show a greater preference for tongue contact and open-mouth kisses. • Men are more willing than women to have sex with someone without kissing, as well as to have sex with someone they are not attracted to or consider to be a bad kisser. • Women place more importance on kissing throughout a relationship, whereas men place less importance on it as the relationship progresses. Improve your kiss If you've ever been told to kiss off after smooching someone beneath the holiday mistletoe, fear not. Like other skills, one's kissing technique can be improved upon. Michael Christian, author of "The Art of Kissing" (under the pen name William Cane), offers classes, and there's a myriad of how-to books and DVDs. To improve your technique, Christian suggests switching up your repertoire with different types of kisses: • Vacuum kiss, in which you suck the air out of your partner's mouth while kissing •Neck kiss, in which you kiss up and down your partner's neck • "Lip-o-suction," in which you kiss the upper lip while your partner kisses the lower lip, and then you reverse. Bad kisses, on the other hand, are relatively easy to pinpoint. "Bad kisses trigger the gag reflex," Christian says. "Bad kisses are also static and repetitious. Varying the speed, intensity and style can help." Spontaneity also can help you get out of a slump. "The best kisses are always the ones that happen accidentally," observes New York City resident Benjamin Kayne, 25, a digital media sales director. "(Planned kisses) are just tedious, and I'm sitting there thinking, 'Is this over yet? The commercial is over and I'm missing "CSI".'

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How to watch Algeria vs Cameroon in CAF WCQs

Cameroon's road to Russia 2018 goes through Algeria. The third and final round of CAF qualifying for the next World Cup sees 20 teams divided into five groups of four. Group winners go through to Russia. Everyone else stays home. It is an unforgiving set-up, and Cameroon paid a heavy price for having sunk to 59th in the FIFA Word Rankings used to seed qualified teams for the draw. The Indomitable Lions are grouped with Algeria ("The best team in Africa," says Cameroon head coach Hugo Broos), Nigeria (2013 Africa Cup of Nations champion; qualifier for five of the last six World Cups), and Zambia (2012 Africa Cup of Nations champion). This round of qualifying will run until November 2017, but Cameroon is starting with its most difficult game first: Algeria is the top-seeded team in the group and Broos is not being flattering when he says the North African side is currently Africa's best. Playing the group favorite on the road is not going to be easy for Cameroon. The Lions' head coach is also, of course, indulging a little expectations management. He has the difficult task of transitioning the Cameroon squad away from the generation that embarrassed itself at the 2014 World Cup. He has wasted little time in reaching out for younger players for his squads, including regular call-ups and caps for the New York Red Bulls' Anatole Abang. Since finding favor with Broos, Abang has fallen out of favor with RBNY - he is currently on loan to Danish second-tier outfit Hobro IK. It will be a surprise if Abang features at all against Algeria: he is a junior member of the squad, and this will be the team's toughest test of its qualifying campaign. But there will be no better chance this year for a Cameroon men's national team player to make a name for himself - if the Lions take even a point out of Algeria, it will be a significant achievement (even though the historical record between the teams favors Cameroon); any player who contributes notably to an unexpected success for Cameroon will draw attention. Per the inimitable livesoccertv.com, the match will be screened in the USA. Algeria vs Cameroon When: 3:30 pm, Eastern; Sunday, October 9, 2016 Where: Stade Mustapha Tchaker, Blida, Algeria TV: beIN Sports (3:20 pm start) Online: beIn Sports Connect; fubo.tv

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